Friday, July 31, 2015

God Bless the Pope



The most important statement on climate change in a very long time came out this summer and it didn't come from the IPCC or the National Academy of Sciences.  No it came from Pope Frances

Now, I'm not a Catholic, but I play like one when I'm in my mountain home in Mexico.  I go to the 200 year old church of Our Lady of the Clean Conception (Nuestra Senora de Concepcion Limpiada) almost everyday to pray to a particularly tortured Jesus back to the right of the Naive. However the real star is St. Frances.  Folks from all over Mexico come to this church to see him. Many of them walk and some walk on their knees.  For St Frances is known as a healer and this church is known for its healing power.

And Pope Frances is doing his part to try to heal the world in his encyclical on Care for our Common Home.  There has been a lot of reporting about the Pope's position and how it may or may not effect change and mobilize the billion Catholics in the world.  Already the Catholic Rs in the US have made it clear that the Pope should stick with Religion since he's not a scientist.  (actually he is)

But very few reports have actually shared the actual language of the letter.  And it is really quite inspired.  Pope Frances begins

1. “LAUDATO SI’, mi’ Signore” – “Praise be to you, my Lord”. In the words of this beautiful canticle, Saint Francis of Assisi reminds us that our common home is like a sister with whom we share our life and a beautiful mother who opens her arms to embrace us. “Praise be to you, my Lord, through our Sister, Mother Earth, who sustains and governs us, and who produces various fruit with coloured flowers and herbs”.[1]
2. This sister now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her by our irresponsible use and abuse of the goods with which God has endowed her. We have come to see ourselves as her lords and masters, entitled to plunder her at will. The violence present in our hearts, wounded by sin, is also reflected in the symptoms of sickness evident in the soil, in the water, in the air and in all forms of life. This is why the earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor; she “groans in travail” (Rom 8:22). We have forgotten that we ourselves are dust of the earth (cf. Gen 2:7); our very bodies are made up of her elements, we breathe her air and we receive life and refreshment from her waters. clip
 Saint Francis of Assisi
10. I do not want to write this Encyclical without turning to that attractive and compelling figure, whose name I took as my guide and inspiration when I was elected Bishop of Rome. I believe that Saint Francis is the example par excellence of care for the vulnerable and of an integral ecology lived out joyfully and authentically. He is the patron saint of all who study and work in the area of ecology, and he is also much loved by non-Christians. He was particularly concerned for God’s creation and for the poor and outcast. He loved, and was deeply loved for his joy, his generous self-giving, his openheartedness. He was a mystic and a pilgrim who lived in simplicity and in wonderful harmony with God, with others, with nature and with himself. He shows us just how inseparable the bond is between concern for nature, justice for the poor, commitment to society, and interior peace. clip
 I. POLLUTION AND CLIMATE CHANGE
23. The climate is a common good, belonging to all and meant for all. At the global level, it is a complex system linked to many of the essential conditions for human life. A very solid scientific consensus indicates that we are presently witnessing a disturbing warming of the climatic system. In recent decades this warming has been accompanied by a constant rise in the sea level and, it would appear, by an increase of extreme weather events, even if a scientifically determinable cause cannot be assigned to each particular phenomenon. Humanity is called to recognize the need for changes of lifestyle, production and consumption, in order to combat this warming or at least the human causes which produce or aggravate it. It is true that there are other factors (such as volcanic activity, variations in the earth’s orbit and axis, the solar cycle), yet a number of scientific studies indicate that most global warming in recent decades is due to the great concentration of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen oxides and others) released mainly as a result of human activity. Concentrated in the atmosphere, these gases do not allow the warmth of the sun’s rays reflected by the earth to be dispersed in space. The problem is aggravated by a model of development based on the intensive use of fossil fuels, which is at the heart of the worldwide energy system. Another determining factor has been an increase in changed uses of the soil, principally deforestation for agricultural purposes.
24. Warming has effects on the carbon cycle. It creates a vicious circle which aggravates the situation even more, affecting the availability of essential resources like drinking water, energy and agricultural production in warmer regions, and leading to the extinction of part of the planet’s biodiversity. The melting in the polar ice caps and in high altitude plains can lead to the dangerous release of methane gas, while the decomposition of frozen organic material can further increase the emission of carbon dioxide. Things are made worse by the loss of tropical forests which would otherwise help to mitigate climate change. Carbon dioxide pollution increases the acidification of the oceans and compromises the marine food chain. If present trends continue, this century may well witness extraordinary climate change and an unprecedented destruction of ecosystems, with serious consequences for all of us. A rise in the sea level, for example, can create extremely serious situations, if we consider that a quarter of the world’s population lives on the coast or nearby, and that the majority of our megacities are situated in coastal areas.
25. Climate change is a global problem with grave implications: environmental, social, economic, political and for the distribution of goods. It represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day. Its worst impact will probably be felt by developing countries in coming decades. Many of the poor live in areas particularly affected by phenomena related to warming, and their means of subsistence are largely dependent on natural reserves and ecosystemic services such as agriculture, fishing and forestry. They have no other financial activities or resources which can enable them to adapt to climate change or to face natural disasters, and their access to social services and protection is very limited. For example, changes in climate, to which animals and plants cannot adapt, lead them to migrate; this in turn affects the livelihood of the poor, who are then forced to leave their homes, with great uncertainty for their future and that of their children. There has been a tragic rise in the number of migrants seeking to flee from the growing poverty caused by environmental degradation. They are not recognized by international conventions as refugees; they bear the loss of the lives they have left behind, without enjoying any legal protection whatsoever. Sadly, there is widespread indifference to such suffering, which is even now taking place throughout our world. clip
It's pretty hard to say this any clearer.   Europe is dealing with this migration issue right now.  Trump would have us build a beautiful wall.  The reality of climate change is upon us. As the new story in Rolling Stone says:

"Historians may look to 2015 as the year when shit really started hitting the fan. Some snapshots: In just the past few months, record-setting heat waves in Pakistan and India each killed more than 1,000 people. In Washington state's Olympic National Park, the rainforest caught fire for the first time in living memory. London reached 98 degrees Fahrenheit during the hottest July day ever recorded in the U.K.; The Guardian briefly had to pause its live blog of the heat wave because its computer servers overheated. In California, suffering from its worst drought in a millennium, a 50-acre brush fire swelled seventyfold in a matter of hours, jumping across the I-15 freeway during rush-hour traffic. Then, a few days later, the region was pounded by intense, virtually unheard-of summer rains. Puerto Rico is under its strictest water rationing in history as a monster El Niño forms in the tropical Pacific Ocean, shifting weather patterns worldwide. clip

Last fall, in northern Alaska, in the same part of the Arctic where Shell is planning to drill for oil, federal scientists discovered 35,000 walruses congregating on a single beach. It was the largest-ever documented "haul out" of walruses, and a sign that sea ice, their favored habitat, is becoming harder and harder to find.

Marine life is moving north, adapting in real time to the warming ocean. Great white sharks have been sighted breeding near Monterey Bay, California, the farthest north that's ever been known to occur. A blue marlin was caught last summer near Catalina Island — 1,000 miles north of its typical range. Across California, there have been sightings of non-native animals moving north, such as Mexican red crabs."

The Pope goes on to say:

207. The Earth Charter asked us to leave behind a period of self-destruction and make a new start, but we have not as yet developed a universal awareness needed to achieve this. Here, I would echo that courageous challenge: “As never before in history, common destiny beckons us to seek a new beginning… Let ours be a time remembered for the awakening of a new reverence for life, the firm resolve to achieve sustainability, the quickening of the struggle for justice and peace, and the joyful celebration of life”

God Bless the Pope 

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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Earthfamilyzeta























It was 10 years and about a month ago when I wrote this post that starts with this quote:

I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me and causes me to tremble for the safety of my country. ... corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands and the Republic is destroyed.  U.S. President Abraham Lincoln, Nov. 21, 1864.

Ten years ago, I was convinced that the only way to save ourselves and our planetary nest was to begin to create new inventions of social contract that transcend the geographic state.  I offered that these new cyberstates or cybercoops would bring human kind to higher levels of cooperation and understanding.

I still am.

Since that time, so much has happened and yet so little has happened.

When I wrote these words a decade ago, there was no Facebook.  There were no smart phones, and there was no Uber, and no so called sharing economy, even though I predicted they would come.  There were no plug in hybrid vehicles, but we would soon start a successful campaign to create them.  There was no Tesla and there were no Nest thermostats.

Most of us still used desk top computers.  Wireless was just becoming ubiquitous.

Hardly any one knew who Barack Obama was.  But in three years, many of us would be enthralled with a new vision of hope and a "can do" attitude.

Soon after the election, the plutocrats ran to their Supreme Court to get their Citizens United decision which would allow the Corporations to give any amount they chose  to the political process because it was "corporate free speech".  The internet  fund raising techniques developed by the Obama campaign was thus neutralized.  And the Corporations kept their hold on government from slipping any further.

Miraculously, the first semi-progressive health care law based on Republican think-tankisms was enacted with democratic majorities in both houses. Even though it still lined the pockets of the 1%, the Affordable Care Act was attacked before the President's signature on the bill was dry.  And just this month, like grateful abused partners and children, we all celebrated its survival from the judicial political attack of the power hungry opposition.

In the meantime, Republicans who once supported climate change actions became emboldened as the "thank you for smoking lobby" managed to confuse those who were looking for something they could tell themselves that would make them see themselves as something that wasn't just plain evil.   Pope Frances has now pretty much fixed that.  Still, humankind lost 10 years of action that may prove to be critical in our combined effort to right the wrong we have brought upon ourselves.

Fortunately, the solutions to climate change have matured.  Wind is the most cost effective way to generate electricity.  And now, just in the last few years, Solar has become the new wind with pricing that coal, nuclear, and gas plants just cannot compete with.  And like the Citizens United solution to people electing their leaders, some plutocrats would take away the tax advantages for renewables that simply level the field with the carbon competition, while leaving the depletion allowance and drilling write offs for oil and gas in tact.

And as I look forward to our third Bush or our second Clinton, without the intoxication of our first non-white President, the vision returns.

We can achieve what we can imagine.  And we can do some of that through our geographic state, or through our local community.  Most of the good work that I have accomplished in the last 10 years has been local.  Within a few years, Austin will be 75% carbon free.

But we can do so much more for ourselves as we begin to understand that soon, very soon, we will be able to help ourselves and one another in new forms of social contract.  New forms of internet family will emerge. Your Facebook family will be replaced with a functioning electronic family.  New neural networks will grow in the fertile human social soil at exponential rates.

These families will provide housing, food, the energy, mobility, communication, the finances, the entertainment, and security to those who choose to create the solutions to the 1% domination that 99% of us must endure.

And in time, the domination of the today's Corpus of Corporations will give way to a Confederation of Cooperations.

There might even be an Earthfamilyzeta.


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Sunday, May 31, 2015

A Unified Energy System: White Paper
























Last month, I was asked by the Sustainability office of the City of Austin to write a White Paper on what I call the Unified Energy System.

So here is my latest try at depicting the kind of energy system we need to adopt if we are to move forward with a low carbon world.

I also want to thank Lucia Athens and her staff for making my writing better. Writers always need editing, no matter how much we may think we don't. 

A Unified Energy System: White Paper
By Michael Osborne
Chairman, City of Austin Electric Utility Commission 


In today’s energy environment, there is a growing need and expectation that our energy systems must become more and more carbon-free. And indeed, renewables are gaining larger shares of the energy pie. Last year alone, over 70 gigawatts of wind and solar were installed globally. Where a goal of 35% renewable energy seemed aggressive just a few years ago, new goals of 55% to 60% are now becoming the new markers of progressive energy policy. Such is the case in Austin, Texas. 

However, in order to reach even higher percentages, we need to rethink the current system. 

In today's world, the stationary energy grid is our electric system. And in this system, large utilities produce and sell energy to their customers in the form of kilowatt-hours. And in the world of transportation, almost all energy comes from oil. Sure, there are electric subways and the like, but most of the energy comes from oil. 

In a Unified Energy Grid, utilities still sell their product to customers, but customers also sell product back to the utility. Instead of the transportation industry running exclusively on oil, it begins to slowly become transformed by electric cars and other transportation appliances that connect not only to the utility, but also to dwellings that are also energy producers. And as the future arrives, those electric-powered vehicles will be able to provide energy and voltage support to the utility on the occasional peak load demand day. Moreover, larger plug-in vehicles with on-board generators can provide critical support and community resilience in times of unplanned outages. 

This triangle of generation, load, and transportation, each feeding and supporting each other, is then encompassed within a sphere of intelligence, the Smart Grid. A Unified Energy System is made complete with smart roads, smart buildings with smart appliances, and networked smart transportation options. 


This grid is further supported by smart policies at the community, regional, and global level that foster and implement what R. Buckminster Fuller called a “Dymaxion World,” defined as “the use of technology and resources to maximum advantage with a minimum of energy and materials.” 

Energy needs to flow in this new unified system from the increasingly green utility to the house and to the car. Energy also needs to flow from the house to the car. And energy must flow in the other direction as well, from the car to the house (if the house is off the grid), from the car to the utility, and from the house to the utility.

With an integrated, unified energy system, we would no longer have the waste that exists at a typical football stadium parking lot where more generation capacity sits idle on the pavement outside the stadium than exists in the whole community's electrical generation portfolio. With plug-in hybrids and other electric transportation appliances, that capacity would no longer be stranded. 

A decade ago, these ideas were considered to be outside the bell curve of accepted public policy. That was before John Wellinghoff, former head of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). While he never used the term Unified Energy System, he preached it. During his tenure as the longest serving chair of the FERC, Wellinghoff worked to make the U.S. power grid cleaner and more efficient, by integrating emerging resources such as renewable energy and demand response, and including energy efficiency and local storage systems such as those in plug-in hybrid and all electric vehicles. 

He championed the agency’s landmark Order 1000, which required grid planners and public utilities to coordinate regional power line projects and encouraged the integration of solar and wind installations. That is exactly what Texas did in building the CREZ lines in the western part of the state. 

And it was before Elon Musk of Tesla began to actualize his vision. 

According to Lyndon Rive, Elon Musk’s cousin and CEO of Solar City, "Thanks to the economies of scale that will come from Tesla's gigafactory, within 10 years every solar system that SolarCity sells will come with a battery-storage system, and it will still produce energy cheaper than what is available from the local utility company." 


The vision of a unified world of energy where renewables, electric cars, and energy storage work together to bring about a transformation where energy is swapped and sold and moved about through the energy economy primarily as electricity is revolutionary. In this near future, this “photonic energy web” will ultimately become an “energy internet.” 

And its embodiment will be a Unified Energy System. 

In the same manner that hydropower in the northwest United States powers southern California through DC intertie, wind fields in the Texas Panhandle may soon help meet peak demand in Phoenix, even as solar fields east of El Paso provide peak power to Dallas, Houston, and Austin. As we sleep, the great nighttime winds of the Llano Estacado will charge our cars for the next day’s urban commute. After we commute to work, these same cars will take on excess early morning solar power from local rooftops that will then be repurchased by the system operator in the afternoon at premium prices.

Through this unification of effort and design, humankind will not only meet the great challenges that face us, we will create a better and more resilient world.



Michael Osborne is the former Special Assistant to the General Manager for Energy Development at Austin Energy. He served as Chairman of the Austin City Council appointed Generation Resource Planning Task Force, which resulted in an adopted plan that will bring the nation’s 8th largest public power utility and the 11th largest city to 55% renewable energy. 

Mr. Osborne is an author, inventor, and policy maker. He has served on the steering committees of the Texas Energy Policy Partnership and the Sustainable Energy Development Council under Governor Ann Richards, and on the Texas Energy Coordination Council appointed by then Governor George Bush. 

As one of three founding members of the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association, he has been at the forefront in making Texas the leading renewable energy state in the United States.


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Thursday, April 30, 2015

Salgado's Salt



We went to see the new documentary by Wim Wenders about the great photographer Salgado this weekend.

As we left,  a couple that looked as dazed and overwhelmed as I felt looked at me and said, "I'm not sure what to do after seeing a movie like that."  I told them I wasn't sure if i wanted to go drink, go pray, go cry, or go fast. 

First of all, if you don't know the work of Salgado,  I suggest you google his last name and then go to images. You will be amazed. Now, imagine these images on a giant screen with the soft narration of the photographer telling the story of the shot and who died and who lived on.

Sebastião Salgado was born on February 8, 1944 in Aimorés, Minas Gerais, Brazil. He is known for his work on The Salt of the Earth (2014), Looking Back at You (1993) and The Spectre of Hope (2002).

This comes from the NY Times in mid March of this year:

Sebastião Salgado has won every major prize a photographer can receive, with his crisp, compassionate black-and-white images, many of them from war zones and other locations of human suffering, hanging on the walls of museums, galleries and private collections around the world. His books, including “Workers,” “Migrations,” “Sahel” and, most recently, the nature-oriented “Genesis,” have consistently met with commercial and critical success.
 Now, as if to complete the picture, a documentary film about Mr. Salgado, 71, and his work is about to opens in theaters across the United States. “The Salt of the Earth,” a collaborative effort between the German director Wim Wenders, who is also a photographer, and Mr. Salgado’s son Juliano Ribeiro Salgado, was nominated for the Oscar for best documentary film, won a prize at the Cannes Film Festival last spring and last month was also awarded a César, the French equivalent of an Academy Award.
 I have seen Salgado's coffee table books over the years and probably have a couple in my art book collections,  but these images take on new power and depth on the screen. They actually seem to come alive.

According to Variety, "Influential critics such as Susan Sontag and Ingrid Sischy accused Sebastiao of turning misery into an aestheticized object for Western consumption, yet reducing these photographs merely to beautiful images corrupts their intent and meaning. Certainly he has a trained eye for striking compositions, but his artistry lies in the way he combines beauty with sensitivity to the inner strength and dignity of even his most wretched subjects. The satisfying beauty of the shot doesn’t work against empathy but rather ennobles those he photographs, resulting in moving, synergistic compositions of deep humanity and drama."

Earlier in the day, at our Sunday brunch, one of our wise ones said something about images and how they effect the brain.  He said that they have a unique pathway to our consciousness that the language mind can't filter.  Like music, they get under our skin and into our hearts where we become transformed and perhaps transmuted into a different kind of human being.  Some images seem to be particularly powerful.

When you have perhaps the greatest photographer of all time working with one of the great cinematographers of our time, it is imaginable that the synthesis of the two might not work.  The opposite happened.  And like any great movie, the third act comes just in time to rescue the viewer from a wrist slit.

The result is a work of cinematographic art that has the power to change any and all of us.  It should be seen on the biggest screen you can find.

It's still on a big screen in Austin.

Don't miss it.

For We are the Salt of the Earth.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Merchants of Doubt



















I started reading Merchants of Doubt in anticipation of the new movie that was released in March. The book by Naomi Oreskes and Eric Conway is so beautifully written, it hardly reads like a science book, but a science book it is.  But it is so much more.  It puts into focus how this country has been bamboozled into two decades of denial and inaction on not only the most pressing issue of our time, but also other critically important issues that demanded regulatory attention due to market failure.

And those failures of course are legend.

This from Wikipedia:

Oreskes and Conway write that a handful of politically conservative scientists, with strong ties to particular industries, have "played a disproportionate role in debates about controversial questions".[5] The authors write that this has resulted in "deliberate obfuscation" of the issues which has had an influence on public opinion and policy-making.[5]

The book criticizes the so-called Merchants of Doubt, some predominantly American science key players, above all Bill Nierenberg, Fred Seitz, and Fred Singer. All three are physicists: Singer was a rocket scientist, whereas Nierenberg and Seitz worked on the atomic bomb.[6] They have been active on topics like acid rain, tobacco smoking, global warming and pesticides. The book claims that these scientists have challenged and diluted the scientific consensus in the various fields, as of the dangers of smoking, the effects of acid rain, the existence of the ozone hole, and the existence of anthropogenic climate change.[5]

Seitz and Singer helped to form institutions such as the Heritage Foundation, Competitive Enterprise Institute and Marshall Institute in the United States. Funded by corporations and conservative foundations, these organizations have opposed many forms of state intervention or regulation of U.S. citizens. The book lists similar tactics in each case: "discredit the science, disseminate false information, spread confusion, and promote doubt"

In seven compelling chapters addressing tobacco, acid rain, the ozone hole, global warming, and DDT, Oreskes and Conway roll back the rug on this dark corner of the American scientific community, showing how the ideology of free market fundamentalism, aided by a too-compliant media, has skewed public understanding of some of the most pressing issues of our era.

The movie however, which finally came to our home town for a very short stand was good, but not great. Rotten Tomatoes describes it:
    
Filmmaker Robert Kenner lifts the curtain on a secretive group of highly charismatic, silver-tongued pundits-for-hire who present themselves in the media as scientific authorities - yet have the contrary aim of spreading maximum confusion about well-studied public threats ranging from toxic chemicals to pharmaceuticals to climate change.
I'm generally not one of those people who says that the book was better than the movie.  But it was.  It tells a much more in depth and sinister tale.

The book tells a story about Al Gore's professor who turned him on to the whole climate change story when he was in college.  Towards the end of his life, one of our villains, Fred Singer, asked  professor Reveille to co-write a paper  with him.  He agreed, but soon thereafter he had a stroke and his health began to falter.  Even then, Reveille made notes on Singer's paper which Singer never included or changed.

Soon after the passing of Al Gore's mentor, the bogus Singer report was published in a non peer reviewed journal.  Its key take away was that there is no need to act now on Climate Change....something Reveille never said nor ever believed.  Yet, the Merchants of Doubt hung that nonstatement around Al Gore like a necklace of Dove Turds.  These people are not just liars....they are mean.

Their belief in the efficacy of the free market  and its importance to a free society in general, over our ability to save ourselves through joint action other than in war is folly, and folly of a high order.

Because you see, according to Fred Singer, an environmentalist is a watermelon...green on the outside and red on the inside.

The merchants of doubt on the other hand are white men with black hearts.



Anyone concerned about the state of democracy in America should read this book.”—Former Vice President Al Gore







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Saturday, February 28, 2015

Stromer Spondylosis






















After our nice trip to the left coast, I came home to wrestle with a condition that I had never heard of.  I had lumbar spondylosis, bacically, a herniated disc.  And as for pain, on a 10 scale, it was an 11.  It occured in a  bicycle accident event when I adjusted my seat height too high. Yes, that's it. I didn't fall, I just extended my left leg a little too much to keep from falling.

My partner and I had just purchased some really cool electric bikes called Stromers.  They don't have a little throttle like my last electric bike  (an A to B), they have a little computer on them where you set the amount of power you want when you apply energy to the pedals.  And its very satisfying.  You end up riding more or less effortlessly depending on the setting ranging from eco to power.  In a crowded urban roadway, these Stromers are the best, fastest way to travel.  And their 22 mile per hour speed is plenty fast.

So, once we got back from the coast, my partner suggested we get some images.  That seemed reasonable.  And thus I got my first MRI.  MRIs are curiously noisy.  And after about 25 minutes in that long donut, I was more than ready to get out of there. Later that day I looked up MRI and found out that it was invented by a guy named Damadian.  Raymond Vahan Damadian was a violin player who just happened to figure out that potassium ions might provide image potential. This from Wikepedia:

Damadian's early work on NMR concerned investigating potassium ions inside cells.[8] He found that the potassium relaxation times were much shorter compared with aqueous solutions of potassium ions. This suggested that potassium was not free but complexed to ‘fixed-charge’ counter-ions, as he had previously determined.


Damadian predicted that cancerous cells would have longer relaxation times, both because of the disordering of malignant cells and because of their elevated potassium levels.

Curiously, others got the nobel prize for his discovery.

And so thanks to Raymond and the rest of his cohorts, I got to see my spine like never before.

Now, let me set it straight.  I have had a bad back ever since the time I was coming down a 500 foot cliff in Colorado and the last ledge before we got to the ground broke off with me on it.  It was a  good thing actually, because a few moments before there were five other 14 year olds on that ledge with me.  As the the ledge broke off, I turned and tried to find something on the cliff to hold on to.   After a few seconds of doing my best impression of Wylie Coyote, I pushed off, opened my arms into flight mode and glided to the earth like a rock.  Remarkably, I walked away.

Ever since that fall in the mountains of Colorado, I've known I had a trick back.  And fifty years later, after running 10 K a day for twenty years or so, and running and working out more than most folks for another 10 years, I got to see the pictures of that day thanks to Ray and my new neurosurgeon Dr. White.

Dr White told me to forget about doing anything other than resting.

And for the month of February that is what I did.

And I am better.

Might even try the Stromer in May.

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Saturday, January 31, 2015

Santa Las Vegas





















We spent the Christmas Holidays in Santa Monica and Las Vegas this year.

My son was turning 40 and he couldn't decide what he wanted to do.

Venice, New York, Paris?

They are all in Las Vegas.

I have always loved Santa Monica and have never really been to Las Vegas.

It always seemed a little icky to me.

Here is my version of it.

You can google it by searching Michael Osborne and Family do Las Vegas.

The Fireworks at the end are pretty cool.


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